Controlling CUBRID Processes

CUBRID processes can be controlled by cubrid utility.

Controlling CUBRID Service

The following cubrid utility syntax shows how to control services registered in the configuration file. One of the following can be specified in <command>.

cubrid service <command>
<command>: {start|stop|restart|status}
  • start: start services.
  • stop: stop services.
  • restart: restart services.
  • status: check status.

No additional options or arguments are required.

Controlling Database Server

The following cubrid utility syntax shows how to control database server process.

cubrid server <command> [database_name]
<command>: {start|stop|restart|status}

One of the following can be specified in <command>:

  • start: start a database server process.
  • stop: stop a database server process.
  • restart: restart a database server process.
  • status: check status of a database server process.

Every command except status must have a database name as an argument.

Controlling Broker

The following cubrid utility syntax shows how to control CUBRID broker process.

cubrid broker <command>
<command>: start
           |stop
           |restart
           |status [options] [broker_name_expr]
           |acl {status|reload} broker_name
           |on <broker_name> |off <broker_name>
           |reset broker_name
           |info
  • start: start broker processes.
  • stop: stop broker processes.
  • restart: restart broker processes.
  • status: check status of broker processes.
  • acl: limit broker access.
  • on/off: enable/disable the specified broker.
  • reset: reset the connection to broker.
  • info: display the broker configuration information.

Controlling CUBRID Manager Server

To use the CUBRID Manager, the Manager server must be running where database server is running. The following cubrid utility syntax shows how to control the CUBRID Manager processes.

cubrid manager <command>
<command>: {start|stop|status}
  • start: start manager server processes.
  • stop: stop manager server processes.
  • status: check the status of manager processes.

Controlling CUBRID HA

The following cubrid heartbeat utility syntax shows how to use CUBRID HA. One of the following can be specified in command.

cubrid heartbeat <command>
<command>: {start|stop|copylogdb|applylogdb|reload|status}
  • start: start HA-related processes.
  • stop: stop HA-related processes.
  • copylogdb: start or stop copylogdb process.
  • applylogdb: start or stop applylogdb process.
  • reload: reload information on HA configuration.
  • status: check HA status.

For details, see cubrid heartbeat Utility.

CUBRID Services

Registering Services

You can register database servers, CUBRID brokers, CUBRID Manager(s) or CUBRID HA as CUBRID service in the configuration file ( cubrid.conf ). To register services, you can input for each server, broker, manager or heartbeat as a parameter value, and it is possible to input several values by concatenating them in comma(,).

If you do not register any service, only master process is registered by default. It is convenient for you to view status of all related processes at a glance or start and stop the processes at once with the cubrid service utility once it is registered as CUBRID service.

For details on CUBRID HA configuration, see Registering HA to cubrid service.

The following example shows how to register database server and broker as service in the cubrid.conf file and enable databases ( demodb and testdb ) to start automatically at once when CUBRID server starts running.

# cubrid.conf
...

[service]

# The list of processes to be started automatically by 'cubrid service start' command
# Any combinations are available with server, broker, manager and heartbeat.
service=server,broker

# The list of database servers in all by 'cubrid service start' command.
# This property is effective only when the above 'service' property contains 'server' keyword.
server=demodb,testdb

Starting Services

In Linux environment, you can enter the code below to start CUBRID after installation. If no server is registered in the configuration file, only master process (cub_master) runs by default.

In the Windows environment, the code below is normally executed only if a user with system permission has logged in. An administrator or general user can start or stop the CUBRID server by clicking its icon on the taskbar tray.

% cubrid service start

@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master start: success

The following message is returned if master process is already running.

% cubrid service start

@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master is running.

The following message is returned if master process fails to run. The example shows that service fails to start due to conflicts of the cubrid_port_id parameter value specified in the cubrid.conf file. In such a case, you can resolve the problem by changing the port. If it fails to start even though no port is occupied by process, delete /tmp/CUBRID1523 file and then restart the process.

% cubrid service start

@ cubrid master start
cub_master: '/tmp/CUBRID1523' file for UNIX domain socket exist.... Operation not permitted
++ cubrid master start: fail

After registering service as explained in CUBRID Services, enter the code below to start the service. You can verify that database server process and broker as well as registered demodb and testdb are starting at once.

% cubrid service start

@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master start: success
@ cubrid server start: demodb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of restore works to do.
CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success
@ cubrid server start: testdb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.
CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success
@ cubrid broker start
++ cubrid broker start: success

Stopping Services

Enter code below to stop CUBRID service. If no services are registered by a user, only master process stops and then restarts.

% cubrid service stop
@ cubrid master stop
++ cubrid master stop: success

Enter code below to stop registered CUBRID service. You can verify that server process, broker process, and master process as well as demodb and testdb stop at once.

% cubrid service stop
@ cubrid server stop: demodb

Server demodb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success
@ cubrid server stop: testdb
Server testdb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success
@ cubrid broker stop
++ cubrid broker stop: success
@ cubrid master stop
++ cubrid master stop: success

Restarting Services

Enter code below to restart CUBRID service. If no services are registered by a user, only master process stops and then restarts.

% cubrid service restart

@ cubrid master stop
++ cubrid master stop: success
@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master start: success

Enter code below to restart registered CUBRID service. You can verify that server process, broker process, and master process as well as demodb and testdb stop and then restart at once.

% cubrid service restart

@ cubrid server stop: demodb
Server demodb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success
@ cubrid server stop: testdb
Server testdb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success
@ cubrid broker stop
++ cubrid broker stop: success
@ cubrid master stop
++ cubrid master stop: success
@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master start: success
@ cubrid server start: demodb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.

CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success
@ cubrid server start: testdb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.

CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success
@ cubrid broker start
++ cubrid broker start: success

Managing Service Status

The following example shows how to check the status of master process and database server registered.

% cubrid service status

@ cubrid master status
++ cubrid master is running.
@ cubrid server status

Server testdb (rel 10.2, pid 31059)
Server demodb (rel 10.2, pid 30950)

@ cubrid broker status
% query_editor
----------------------------------------
ID   PID   QPS   LQS PSIZE STATUS
----------------------------------------
 1 15465     0     0 48032 IDLE
 2 15466     0     0 48036 IDLE
 3 15467     0     0 48036 IDLE
 4 15468     0     0 48036 IDLE
 5 15469     0     0 48032 IDLE

% broker1 OFF

@ cubrid manager server status
++ cubrid manager server is not running.

The following message is returned if master process has stopped.

% cubrid service status
@ cubrid master status
++ cubrid master is not running.

cubrid Utility Logging

CUBRID supports a logging feature about cubrid utility’s running result.

Logging contents

The following contents are written to the $CUBRID/log/cubrid_utility.log file.

  • All commands through cubrid utilities: only usage, version and parsing errors are not logged.
  • Execution results by cubrid utilities: success/failure.
  • An error message when failure.

Log file size

A size of cubrid_utility.log file is expanded by the size specified by error_log_size parameter in cubrid.conf; if this size is enlarged as the specified size, it is backed up as the cubrid_utility.log.bak file.

Log format

<time> (cubrid PID) <contents>

The following is an example of printing the log file.

13-11-19 15:27:19.426 (17724) cubrid manager stop
13-11-19 15:27:19.430 (17724) FAILURE: ++ cubrid manager server is not running.
13-11-19 15:27:19.434 (17726) cubrid service start
13-11-19 15:27:19.439 (17726) FAILURE: ++ cubrid master is running.
13-11-19 15:27:22.931 (17726) SUCCESS
13-11-19 15:27:22.936 (17756) cubrid service restart
13-11-19 15:27:31.667 (17756) SUCCESS
13-11-19 15:27:31.671 (17868) cubrid service stop
13-11-19 15:27:34.909 (17868) SUCCESS

However, in Windows, some cubrid commands are executed through a service process; therefore, a duplicated information can be displayed again.

13-11-13 17:17:47.638 ( 3820) cubrid service stop
13-11-13 17:17:47.704 ( 7848) d:\CUBRID\bin\cubrid.exe service stop --for-windows-service
13-11-13 17:17:56.027 ( 7848) SUCCESS
13-11-13 17:17:57.136 ( 3820) SUCCESS

And, in Windows, a process run through the service process cannot print out an error message; therefore, for error messages related to the service start, you should definitely check them in the cubrid_utility.log file.

Database Server

Starting Database Server

The following example shows how to run demodb server.

% cubrid server start demodb

@ cubrid server start: demodb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.

CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success

If you start demodb server while master process has stopped, master process automatically runs at first and then a specified database server runs.

% cubrid server start demodb

@ cubrid master start
++ cubrid master start: success
@ cubrid server start: demodb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.

CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success

The following message is returned while demodb server is running.

% cubrid server start demodb

@ cubrid server start: demodb
++ cubrid server 'demodb' is running.

cubrid server start runs cub_server process of a specific database regardless of HA mode configuration. To run database in HA environment, you should use cubrid heartbeat start.

Stopping Database Server

The following example shows how to stop demodb server.

% cubrid server stop demodb

@ cubrid server stop: demodb
Server demodb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success

The following message is returned while demodb server has stopped.

% cubrid server stop demodb

@ cubrid server stop: demodb
++ cubrid server 'demodb' is not running.

cubrid server stop stops cub_server process of a specific database regardless of HA mode configuration. Be careful not to restart the database server or occur failover. To stop database in HA environment, you should use cubrid heartbeat stop .

Restarting Database Server

The following example shows how to restart demodb server. demodb server that has already run stops and the server restarts.

% cubrid server restart demodb

@ cubrid server stop: demodb
Server demodb notified of shutdown.
This may take several minutes. Please wait.
++ cubrid server stop: success
@ cubrid server start: demodb

This may take a long time depending on the amount of recovery works to do.

CUBRID 10.2

++ cubrid server start: success

Checking Database Server Status

The following example shows how to check the status of a database server. Names of currently running database servers are displayed.

% cubrid server status

@ cubrid server status
Server testdb (rel 10.2, pid 24465)
Server demodb (rel 10.2, pid 24342)

The following example shows the message when master process has stopped.

% cubrid server status

@ cubrid server status
++ cubrid master is not running.

Limiting Database Server Access

To limit brokers and the CSQL Interpreter connecting to the database server, configure the parameter value of access_ip_control in the cubrid.conf file to yes and enter the path of a file in which the list of IP addresses allowed to access the access_ip_control_file parameter value is written. You should enter the absolute file path. If you enter the relative path, the system will search the file under the $CUBRID/conf directory on Linux and under the %CUBRID%\conf directory on Windows.

The following example shows how to configure the cubrid.conf file.

# cubrid.conf
access_ip_control=yes
access_ip_control_file="/home1/cubrid1/CUBRID/db.access"

The following example shows the format of the access_ip_control_file file.

[@<db_name>]
<ip_addr>
...
  • <db_name>: The name of a database in which access is allowed
  • <ip_addr>: The IP address allowed to access a database. Using an asterisk (*) at the last digit means that all IP addresses are allowed. Several lines of <ip_addr> can be added in the next line of the name of a database.

To configure several databases, it is possible to specify additional [@<db_name>] and <ip_addr>.

Accessing any IP address except localhost is blocked by server if access_ip_control is set to yes but ip_control_file is not configured. A server will not run if analyzing access_ip_control_file fails caused by incorrect format.

The following example shows access_ip_control_file.

[@dbname1]
10.10.10.10
10.156.*

[@dbname2]
*

[@dbname3]
192.168.1.15

The example above shows that dbname1 database allows the access of IP addresses starting with 10.156; dbname2 database allows the access of every IP address; dbname3 database allows the access of an IP address, 192.168.1.15, only.

For the database which has already been running, you can modify a configuration file or you can check the currently applied status by using the following commands.

To change the contents of access_ip_control_file and apply it to server, use the following command.

cubrid server acl reload <database_name>

To display the IP configuration of a server which is currently running, use the following command.

cubrid server acl status <database_name>

Database Server Log

Error Log

The following log is created in the file of a server error log if an IP address that is not allowed to access is used.

Time: 10/29/10 17:32:42.360 - ERROR *** ERROR CODE = -1022, Tran = 0, CLIENT = (unknown):(unknown)(-1), EID = 2
Address(10.24.18.66) is not authorized.

An error log of the database server is saved into $CUBRID/log/server directory, and the format of the file name is <db_name>_<yyyymmdd>_<hhmi>.err. The extension is “.err”.

demodb_20130618_1655.err

Note

For details on how to limit an access to the broker server, see Limiting Broker Access.

Event Log

If an event which affects on the query performance occurs, this is saved into the event log.

The events which are saved on the event log are SLOW_QUERY, MANY_IOREADS, LOCK_TIMEOUT, DEADLOCK and TEMP_VOLUME_EXPAND.

This log file is saved into the $CUBRID/log/server directory, and the format of the file name is <db_name>_<yyyymmdd>_<hhmi>.event. The extension is “.event”.

demodb_20130618_1655.event

SLOW_QUERY

If a slow query occurs, this event is written. If sql_trace_slow parameter value of cubrid.conf is set, this event will arise. The output example is as follows.

06/12/13 16:41:05.558 - SLOW_QUERY
  client: PUBLIC@testhost|csql(13173)
  sql: update [y] [y] set [y].[a]= ?:1  where [y].[a]= ?:0  using index [y].[pk_y_a](+)
  bind: 5
  bind: 200
  time: 1015
  buffer: fetch=48, ioread=2, iowrite=0
  wait: cs=1, lock=1010, latch=0
  • client: <DB user>@<application client host name>|<program name>(<process ID>)
  • sql: slow query
  • bind: binding value. it is printed out as the number of <num> in the sql item, “?:<num>”. The value of “?:0” is 5, and the value of “?:1” is 200.
  • time: execution time(ms)
  • buffer: execution statistics in the buffer
    • fetch: fetching pages count
    • ioread: I/O read pages count
    • iowrite: I/O write pages count
  • wait: waiting time
    • cs: waiting time on the critical section(ms)
    • lock: waiting time to acquire the lock(ms)
    • latch: waiting time to acquire the latch(ms)

On the above example, the query execution time was 1015ms, and lock waiting time was 1010ms, so we can indicate that almost all execution time was from lock waiting.

MANY_IOREADS

Queries which brought many I/O reads are written on the event log. If I/O reads occurs more than sql_trace_ioread_pages parameter value of cubrid.conf, the event is written on the event log. The following is an output example.

06/12/13 17:07:29.457 - MANY_IOREADS
  client: PUBLIC@testhost|csql(12852)
  sql: update [x] [x] set [x].[a]= ?:1  where ([x].[a]> ?:0 ) using index [x].[idx](+)
  bind: 8
  bind: 100
  time: 528
  ioreads: 15648
  • client: <DB user>@<application client host name>|<process name>(<process ID>)
  • sql: an SQL which brought many I/O reads
  • bind: binding value. it is printed out as the number of <num> in the sql item, “?:<num>”. The value of “?:0” is 8, and the value of “?:1” is 100.
  • time: execution time(ms)
  • ioread: I/O read pages count

LOCK_TIMEOUT

When lock timeout occurs, queries of a waiter and a blocker are written on the event log. The following is an output example.

02/02/16 20:56:18.650 - LOCK_TIMEOUT
waiter:
  client: public@testhost|csql(21529)
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|3, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 2
  bind: 1

blocker:
  client: public@testhost|csql(21541)
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|3, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 3
  bind: 1
  • waiter: a waiting client to acquire locks.
    • lock: lock type, table and index names
    • sql: a waiting SQL to acquire locks.
    • bind: binding value.
  • blocker: a client to have locks.
    • lock: lock type, table and index names
    • sql: a SQL which is acquiring locks
    • bind: binding value

On the above, you can indicate the blocker which brought lock timeout and the waiter which is waiting locks.

DEADLOCK

When a deadlock occurs, lock information of that transaction is written into the event log. The following is an output example.

02/02/16 20:56:17.638 - DEADLOCK
client: public@testhost|csql(21541)
hold:
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|5, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 3
  bind: 1

  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|3, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 3
  bind: 1

wait:
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|4, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 5
  bind: 2

client: public@testhost|csql(21529)
hold:
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|6, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 4
  bind: 2

  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|4, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 4
  bind: 2

wait:
  lock:    X_LOCK (oid=0|650|3, table=t)
  sql: update [t] [t] set [t].[a]= ?:0  where [t].[a]= ?:1
  bind: 6
  bind: 1
  • client: <DB user>@<application client host name>|<process name>(<process ID>)
    • hold: an object which is acquiring a lock
      • lock: lock type, table name
      • sql: SQL which is acquiring locks
      • bind: binding value
    • wait: an object which is waiting a lock
      • lock: lock type, table name
      • sql: SQL which is waiting a lock
      • bind: binding value

On the above output, you can check the application clients and SQLs which brought the deadlock.

For more details on locks, see lockdb and Lock Protocol.

TEMP_VOLUME_EXPAND

When a temporary volumes are expanded, this time is written to the event log. By this log, you can check what transaction brought the expansion of a temporary volumes.

06/15/13 18:55:43.458 - TEMP_VOLUME_EXPAND
  client: public@testhost|csql(17540)
  sql: select [x].[a], [x].[b] from [x] [x] where (([x].[a]< ?:0 )) group by [x].[b] order by 1
  bind: 1000
  time: 44
  pages: 24399
  • client: <DB user>@<application client host name>|<process name>(<process ID>)
  • sql: SQL which requires a more space for temporary data. All INSERT statement except for INSERT … SELECT syntax, and DDL statement are not delivered to the DB server, so it is shown as EMPTY SELECT, UPDATE and DELETE statements are shown on this item
  • bind: binding value
  • time: the required time to create a temporary volume(ms)
  • pages: the number of available pages within new temporary volume.

Database Server Errors

Database server error processes use the server error code when an error has occurred. A server error can occur in any task that uses server processes. For example, server errors may occur while using the query handling program or the cubrid utility.

Checking the Database Server Error Codes

  • Every data definition statement starting with #define ER_ in the $CUBRID/include/dbi.h file indicate the server error codes.
  • All message groups under “$set 5 MSGCAT_SET_ERROR” in the CUBRID/msg/en_US (in Korean, ko_KR.eucKR or ko_KR.utf8)/cubrid.msg $ file indicates the server error messages.

When you write a C code with CCI driver, we recommend you to write a code with an error code name than with an error code number. For example, the error code number for violating the unique key is -670 or -886, but users can easily recognize the error when it is written as ER_BTREE_UNIQUE_FAILED or ER_UNIQUE_VIOLATION_WITHKEY.

However, when you write a JAVA code with JDBC driver, you have to use error code numbers because “dbi.h” file cannot be included into the JAVA code. For JDBC program, you can get an error number by using getErrorCode() method of SQLException class.

$ vi $CUBRID/include/dbi.h

#define NO_ERROR                                       0
#define ER_FAILED                                     -1
#define ER_GENERIC_ERROR                              -1
#define ER_OUT_OF_VIRTUAL_MEMORY                      -2
#define ER_INVALID_ENV                                -3
#define ER_INTERRUPTED                                -4
...
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_SIMPLE_MSG              -73
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_CLASS_MSG               -74
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_CLASSOF_MSG             -75
#define ER_LK_PAGE_TIMEOUT                           -76
...
#define ER_PT_SYNTAX                                -493
...
#define ER_BTREE_UNIQUE_FAILED                      -670
...
#define ER_UNIQUE_VIOLATION_WITHKEY                 -886
...
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_SIMPLE_MSG          -966
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_CLASS_MSG           -967
#define ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_CLASSOF_MSG         -968
...

The following are some of the server error code names, error code numbers, and error messages.

Error Code Name Error Code Number Error Message
ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_SIMPLE_MSG -73 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on object ?|?|?. You are waiting for user(s) ? to finish.
ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_CLASS_MSG -74 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on class ?. You are waiting for user(s) ? to finish.
ER_LK_OBJECT_TIMEOUT_CLASSOF_MSG -75 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on instance ?|?|? of class ?. You are waiting for user(s) ? to finish.
ER_LK_PAGE_TIMEOUT -76 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? on page ?|?. You are waiting for user(s) ? to release the page lock.
ER_PT_SYNTAX -493 Syntax: ?
ER_BTREE_UNIQUE_FAILED -670 Operation would have caused one or more unique constraint violations.
ER_UNIQUE_VIOLATION_WITHKEY -886 “?” caused unique constraint violation.
ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_SIMPLE_MSG -966 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on object ?|?|? because of deadlock. You are waiting for user(s) ? to finish.
ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_CLASS_MSG -967 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on class ? because of deadlock. You are waiting for user(s) ? to finish.
ER_LK_OBJECT_DL_TIMEOUT_CLASSOF_MSG -968 Your transaction (index ?, ?@?|?) timed out waiting on ? lock on instance ?|?|? of class ? because of deadlock. You are waiting for user(s) ? to

Broker

Starting Broker

Enter the command below to start the broker.

$ cubrid broker start
@ cubrid broker start
++ cubrid broker start: success

The following message is returned if the broker is already running.

$ cubrid broker start
@ cubrid broker start
++ cubrid broker is running.

Stopping Broker

Enter the command below to stop the broker.

$ cubrid broker stop
@ cubrid broker stop
++ cubrid broker stop: success

The following message is returned if the broker has stopped.

$ cubrid broker stop
@ cubrid broker stop
++ cubrid broker is not running.

Restarting Broker

Enter the command below to restart the whole brokers.

$ cubrid broker restart

Checking Broker Status

The cubrid broker status utility allows you to check the broker status such as number of completed jobs and the number of standby jobs by providing various options.

cubrid broker status [options] [expr]
  • expr: A part of the broker name or “SERVICE=ON|OFF”

Specifying expr performs that the status of specific brokers which include expr in their names is monitored; specifying no argument means that status of all brokers which are registered in the broker environment configuration file ( cubrid_broker.conf ) is monitored.

If “SERVICE=ON” is specified on expr, only the status of working brokers is displayed; if “SERVICE=OFF” is specified, only the status of stopped brokers is displayed.

The following [options] are available with the cubrid broker status utility. -b, -q, -c, -m, -S, -P and -f are options to define the information to print; -s, -l and -t are options to control printing. All of these are possible to use as combining each other.

-b

Displays the status information of a broker but does not display information on broker application server.

-q

Displays standby jobs in the job queue.

-f

Displays information of DB and host accessed by broker.

If it is used with the -b option, additional information on CAS is displayed. But SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, OTHERS items which shown on -b option are excluded.

If it is used with the -P option, STMT-POOL-RATIO is additionally printed. This item shows the ratio to use statements in the pool when you are using prepared statements.

-l SECOND

The -l option is only used with -f option together. It specifies accumulation period (unit: sec.) when displaying the number of application servers whose client status is Waiting or Busy. If it is omitted, the default value (1 second) is specified.

-t

Displays results in tty mode on the screen. The output can be redirected and used as a file.

-s SECOND

Regularly displays the status of broker based on specified period. It returns to a command prompt if q is entered.

If you do not specify options or arguments, the status of all brokers is displayed.

$ cubrid broker status
@ cubrid broker status
% query_editor
----------------------------------------
ID   PID   QPS   LQS PSIZE STATUS
----------------------------------------
 1 28434     0     0 50144 IDLE
 2 28435     0     0 50144 IDLE
 3 28436     0     0 50144 IDLE
 4 28437     0     0 50140 IDLE
 5 28438     0     0 50144 IDLE

% broker1 OFF
  • % query_editor: The broker name
  • ID: Serial number of CAS within the broker
  • PID: CAS process ID within the broker
  • QPS: The number of queries processed per second
  • LQS: The number of long-duration queries processed per second
  • PSIZE: Size of CAS
  • STATUS: The current status of CAS (BUSY, IDLE, CLIENT_WAIT, CLOSE_WAIT)
  • % broker1 OFF: broker1’s SERVICE parameter is set to OFF. So, broker1 is not started.

The following shows the detail status of broker for 5 seconds. The display will reset per 5 seconds as the new status information. To escape the display of the status, press <Q>.

$ cubrid broker status -b -s 5
@ cubrid broker status

 NAME                    PID  PORT   AS   JQ    TPS    QPS   SELECT   INSERT   UPDATE   DELETE   OTHERS     LONG-T     LONG-Q   ERR-Q  UNIQUE-ERR-Q  #CONNECT  #REJECT
=======================================================================================================================================================================
* query_editor         13200 30000    5    0      0      0        0        0        0        0        0     0/60.0     0/60.0       0             0         0        0
* broker1              13269 33000    5    0     70     60       10       20       10       10       10     0/60.0     0/60.0      30            10       213        1
  • NAME: The broker name
  • PID: Process ID of the broker
  • PORT: Port number of the broker
  • AS: The number of CAS
  • JQ: The number of standby jobs in the job queue
  • TPS: The number of transactions processed per second (calculated only when the option is configured to “-b -s <sec>”)
  • QPS: The number of queries processed per second (calculated only when the option is configured to “-b -s <sec>”)
  • SELECT: The number of SELECT queries after staring of the broker. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of SELECTs which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • INSERT: The number of INSERT queries after staring of the broker. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of INSERTs which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • UPDATE: The number of UPDATE queries after staring of the broker. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of UPDATEs which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • DELETE: The number of DELETE queries after staring of the broker. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of DELETEs which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • OTHERS: The number of queries like CREATE and DROP except for SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of queries which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • LONG-T: The number of transactions which exceed LONG_TRANSACTION_TIME. / the value of the LONG_TRANSACTION_TIME parameter. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of transactions which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • LONG-Q: The number of queries which exceed LONG_QUERY_TIME. / the value of the LONG_QUERY_TIME parameter. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of queries which have been executed during the seconds specified by this option.
  • ERR-Q: The number of queries with errors found. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of errors which have occurred during the seconds specified by this option.
  • UNIQUE-ERR-Q: The number of queries with unique key errors found. When there is an option of “-b -s <sec>”, it is updated every time with the number of unique key errors which have occurred during the seconds specified by this option.
  • #CONNECT: The number of connections that an application client accesses to CAS after starting the broker.
  • #REJECT: The count that an application client excluded from ACL IP list is rejected to access a CAS. Regarding ACL setting, see Limiting Broker Access.

The following checks the status of broker whose name includes broker1 and job status of a specific broker in the job queue with the -q option. If you do not specify broker1 as an argument, list of jobs in the job queue for all brokers is displayed.

% cubrid broker status -q broker1
@ cubrid broker status
% broker1
----------------------------------------
ID   PID   QPS   LQS PSIZE STATUS
----------------------------------------
 1 28444     0     0 50144 IDLE
 2 28445     0     0 50140 IDLE
 3 28446     0     0 50144 IDLE
 4 28447     0     0 50144 IDLE
 5 28448     0     0 50144 IDLE

The following monitors the status of a broker whose name includes broker1 with the -s option. If you do not specify broker1 as an argument, monitoring status for all brokers is performed regularly. It returns to a command prompt if q is not entered.

% cubrid broker status -s 5 broker1
% broker1
----------------------------------------
ID   PID   QPS   LQS PSIZE STATUS
----------------------------------------
 1 28444     0     0 50144 IDLE
 2 28445     0     0 50140 IDLE
 3 28446     0     0 50144 IDLE
 4 28447     0     0 50144 IDLE
 5 28448     0     0 50144 IDLE

With the -t option, it display information of TPS and QPS to a file. To cancel displaying, press <Ctrl+C> to stop program.

% cubrid broker status -b -t -s 1 > log_file

The following views information of server/database accessed by broker, the last access times of applications, the IP addresses accessed to CAS and the versions of drivers etc. with the -f option.

$ cubrid broker status -f broker1
@ cubrid broker status
% broker1
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ID   PID   QPS   LQS PSIZE STATUS         LAST ACCESS TIME      DB       HOST   LAST CONNECT TIME       CLIENT IP   CLIENT VERSION    SQL_LOG_MODE   TRANSACTION STIME  #CONNECT  #RESTART
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1 26946     0     0 51168 IDLE         2011/11/16 16:23:42  demodb  localhost 2011/11/16 16:23:40      10.0.1.101     9.2.0.0062              NONE 2011/11/16 16:23:42         0         0
 2 26947     0     0 51172 IDLE         2011/11/16 16:23:34      -          -                   -          0.0.0.0                                -                   -         0         0
 3 26948     0     0 51172 IDLE         2011/11/16 16:23:34      -          -                   -          0.0.0.0                                -                   -         0         0
 4 26949     0     0 51172 IDLE         2011/11/16 16:23:34      -          -                   -          0.0.0.0                                -                   -         0         0
 5 26950     0     0 51172 IDLE         2011/11/16 16:23:34      -          -                   -          0.0.0.0                                -                   -         0         0

Meaning of each column in code above is as follows:

  • LAST ACCESS TIME: Time when CAS runs or the latest time when an application client accesses CAS
  • DB: Name of a database which CAS accesses most recently
  • HOST: Name of a which CAS accesses most recently
  • LAST CONNECT TIME: Most recent time when CAS accesses a database
  • CLIENT IP: IP of an application clients currently being connected to an application server(CAS). If no application client is connected, 0.0.0.0 is displayed.
  • CLIENT VERSION: A driver’s version of an application client currently being connected to a CAS
  • SQL_LOG_MODE: SQL logging mode of CAS. If the mode is same as the mode configured in the broker, “-” is displayed.
  • TRANSACTION STIME: Transaction start time
  • #CONNECT: The number of connections that an application client accesses to CAS after starting the broker
  • #RESTART: The number of connection that CAS is re-running after starting the broker

Enter the command below with the -b and -f options to display AS(T W B Ns-W Ns-B) and CANCELED additionally.

// The -f option is added upon execution of broker status information. Configuring Ns-W and Ns-B are displayed as long as N seconds by using the -l.
% cubrid broker status -b -f -l 2
@ cubrid broker status
NAME          PID    PSIZE PORT  AS(T W B 2s-W 2s-B) JQ TPS QPS LONG-T LONG-Q  ERR-Q UNIQUE-ERR-Q CANCELED ACCESS_MODE SQL_LOG  #CONNECT #REJECT
================================================================================================================================================
query_editor 16784 56700 30000      5 0 0     0   0   0  16  29 0/60.0 0/60.0      1            1        0          RW     ALL         4       1

Meaning of added columns in code above is as follows:

  • AS(T): Total number of CAS being executed
  • AS(W): The number of CAS in the status of Waiting
  • AS(B): The number of CAS in the status of Busy
  • AS(Ns-W): The number of CAS that the client belongs to has been waited for N seconds.
  • AS(Ns-B): The number of CAS that the client belongs to has been Busy for N seconds.
  • CANCELED: The number of queries have cancelled by user interruption since the broker starts (if it is used with the -l N option, it specifies the number of accumulations for N seconds).

Limiting Broker Access

To limit the client applications accessing the broker, set to ON for the ACCESS_ CONTROL parameter in the cubrid_broker.conf file, and enter a name of the file in which the users and the list of databases and IP addresses allowed to access the ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE parameter value are written. The default value of the ACCESS_CONTROL broker parameter is OFF. The ACCESS_CONTROL and ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE parameters must be written under [broker] which common parameters are specified.

The format of ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE is as follows:

[%<broker_name>]
<db_name>:<db_user>:<ip_list_file>
...
  • <broker_name>: A broker name. It is the one of broker names specified in cubrid_broker.conf .
  • <db_name>: A database name. If it is specified as *, all databases are allowed to access the broker server.
  • <db_user>: A database user ID. If it is specified as *, all database user IDs are allowed to access the broker server.
  • <ip_list_file>: Names of files in which the list of accessible IPs are stored. Several files such as ip_list_file1, ip_list_file2, … can be specified by using a comma (,).

[%<broker_name>] and <db_name>:<db_user>:<ip_list_file> can be specified separately for each broker. A separated line can be specified for the same <db_name> and the same <db_user>. List of IPs can be written up to the maximum of 256 lines per <db_name>:<db_user> in a broker.

The format of the ip_list_file is as follows:

<ip_addr>
...
  • <ip_addr>: An IP address that is allowed to access the server. If the last digit of the address is specified as *, all IP addresses in that rage are allowed to access the broker server.

If a value for ACCESS_CONTROL is set to ON and a value for ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE is not specified, the broker will only allow the access requests from the localhost.

If the analysis of ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE and ip_list_file fails when starting a broker, the broker will not be run.

# cubrid_broker.conf
[broker]
MASTER_SHM_ID           =30001
ADMIN_LOG_FILE          =log/broker/cubrid_broker.log
ACCESS_CONTROL   =ON
ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE     =/home1/cubrid/access_file.txt
[%QUERY_EDITOR]
SERVICE                 =ON
BROKER_PORT             =30000
......

The following example shows the content of ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE. The * symbol represents everything, and you can use it when you want to specify database names, database user IDs and IPs in the IP list file which are allowed to access the broker server.

[%QUERY_EDITOR]
dbname1:dbuser1:READIP.txt
dbname1:dbuser2:WRITEIP1.txt,WRITEIP2.txt
*:dba:READIP.txt
*:dba:WRITEIP1.txt
*:dba:WRITEIP2.txt

[%BROKER2]
dbname:dbuser:iplist2.txt

[%BROKER3]
dbname:dbuser:iplist2.txt

[%BROKER4]
dbname:dbuser:iplist2.txt

The brokers specified above are QUERY_EDITOR, BROKER2, BROKER3, and BROKER4.

The QUERY_EDITOR broker only allows the following application access requests.

  • When a user logging into dbname1 with a dbuser1 account connects from IPs registered in READIP.txt
  • When a user logging into dbname1 with a dbuser2 account connects from IPs registered in WRITEIP1.txt and WRITEIP2.txt
  • When a user logging into every database with a DBA account connects from IPs registered in READIP.txt, WRITEIP1.txt, and WRITEIP2.txt

The following example shows how to specify the IPs allowed in ip_list_file.

192.168.1.25
192.168.*
10.*
*

The descriptions for the IPs specified in the example above are as follows:

  • The first line setting allows an access from 192.168.1.25.
  • The second line setting allows an access from all IPs starting with 192.168.
  • The third line setting allows an access from all IPs starting with 10.
  • The fourth line setting allows an access from all IPs.

For the broker which has already been running, you can modify the configuration file or check the currently applied status of configuration by using the following commands.

To configure databases, database user IDs and IPs allowed to access the broker and then apply the modified configuration to the server, use the following command.

cubrid broker acl reload [<BR_NAME>]
  • <BR_NAME>: A broker name. If you specify this value, you can apply the changes only to specified brokers. If you omit it, you can apply the changes to all brokers.

To display the databases, database user IDs and IPs that are allowed to access the broker in running on the screen, use the following command.

cubrid broker acl status [<BR_NAME>]
  • <BR_NAME>: A broker name. If you specify the value, you can display the specified broker configuration. If you omit it, you can display all broker configurations.

The below is an example of displaying results.

$ cubrid broker acl status
ACCESS_CONTROL=ON
ACCESS_CONTROL_FILE=access_file.txt

[%broker1]
demodb:dba:iplist1.txt
       CLIENT IP LAST ACCESS TIME
==========================================
    10.20.129.11
  10.113.153.144 2013-11-07 15:19:14
  10.113.153.145
  10.113.153.146
         10.64.* 2013-11-07 15:20:50

testdb:dba:iplist2.txt
       CLIENT IP LAST ACCESS TIME
==========================================
               * 2013-11-08 10:10:12

Broker Logs

If you try to access brokers through IP addresses that are not allowed, the following logs will be created.

  • ACCESS_LOG
1 192.10.10.10 - - 1288340944.198 1288340944.198 2010/10/29 17:29:04 ~ 2010/10/29 17:29:04 14942 - -1 db1 dba : rejected
  • SQL LOG
10/29 10:28:57.591 (0) CLIENT IP 192.10.10.10 10/29 10:28:57.592 (0) connect db db1 user dba url jdbc:cubrid:192.10.10.10:30000:db1::: - rejected

Note

For details on how to limit an access to the database server, see Limiting Database Server Access.

Managing a Specific Broker

Enter the code below to run broker1 only. Note that broker1 should have already been configured in the shared memory.

% cubrid broker on broker1

The following message is returned if broker1 has not been configured in the shared memory.

% cubrid broker on broker1
Cannot open shared memory

Enter the code below to stop broker1 only. Note that service pool of broker1 can also be removed.

% cubrid broker off broker1

The broker reset feature enables broker application servers (CAS) to disconnect the existing connection and reconnect when the servers are connected to unwanted databases due to failover, etc. in HA. For example, once Read Only broker is connected to active servers, it is not automatically connected to standby servers although standby servers are available. Connecting to standby servers is allowed only with the cubrid broker reset command.

Enter the code below to reset broker1.

% cubrid broker reset broker1

Dynamically Changing Broker Parameters

You can configure the parameters related to running the broker in the configuration file ( cubrid_broker.conf ). You can also modify some broker parameters temporarily while the broker is running by using the broker_changer utility. For details, see Broker Configuration.

The syntax for the broker_changer utility, which is used to change broker parameters while the broker is running, is as follows. Enter the name of the currently running broker for the broker_name . The parameters can be used only for dynamically modifiable parameters. The value must be specified based on the parameter to be modified. You can specify the broker CAS identifier ( cas_id ) to apply the changes to the specific broker CAS.

cas_id is an ID to be output by cubrid broker status command.

broker_changer broker_name [cas_id] parameters value

Enter the following to configure the SQL_LOG parameter to ON so that SQL logs can be written to the currently running broker. Such dynamic parameter change is effective only while the broker is running.

% broker_changer query_editor sql_log on
OK

Enter the following to change the ACCESS_MODE to Read Only and automatically reset the broker in HA environment.

% broker_changer broker_m access_mode ro
OK

Note

If you want to control the service using cubrid utilities on Windows Vista or the later versions of Window, you are recommended to open the command prompt window as an administrator. For details, see the notes of CUBRID Utilities.

Broker configuration information

cubrid broker info dumps the currently “working” broker parameters’ configuration information(cubrid_broker.conf). broker parameters’ information can be dynamically changed by broker_changer command; with cubrid broker info command, you can see the configuration information of the working broker.

% cubrid broker info

As a reference, to see the configuration information of the currently “working” system(cubrid.conf), use cubrid paramdump database_name command. By SET SYSTEM PARAMETERS syntax, the configuration information of the system parameters can be changed dynamically; with cubrid broker info command, you can see the configuration information of the system parameters.

Broker Logs

There are three types of logs that relate to starting the broker: access, error and SQL logs. Each log can be found in the log directory under the installation directory. You can change the directory where these logs are to be stored through LOG_DIR and ERROR_LOG_DIR parameters of the broker configuration file (cubrid_broker.conf).

Checking the Access Log

The access log file records information on the application client and is stored to $CUBRID/log/broker/<broker_name>.access file. If the LOG_BACKUP parameter is configured to ON in the broker configuration file, when the broker stops properly, the access log file is stored with the date and time that the broker has stopped. For example, if broker1 stopped at 12:27 P.M. on June 17, 2008, an access file named broker1.access.20080617.1227 is generated in the log/broker directory. The following example shows an access log.

The following example and description show an access log file created in the log directory:

1 192.168.1.203 - - 972523031.298 972523032.058 2008/06/17 12:27:46~2008/06/17 12:27:47 7118 - -1
2 192.168.1.203 - - 972523052.778 972523052.815 2008/06/17 12:27:47~2008/06/17 12:27:47 7119 ERR 1025
1 192.168.1.203 - - 972523052.778 972523052.815 2008/06/17 12:27:49~2008/06/17 12:27:49 7118 - -1
  • 1: ID assigned to the application server of the broker
  • 192.168.1.203: IP address of the application client
  • 972523031.298: UNIX timestamp value when the client’s request processing started
  • 2008/06/17 12:27:46: Time when the client’s request processing started
  • 972523032.058: UNIX timestamp value when the client’s request processing finished
  • 2008/06/17 12:27:47: Time when the client’s request processing finished
  • 7118: Process ID of the application server
  • -1: No error occurred during the request processing
  • ERR 1025: Error occurred during the request processing. Error information exists in offset=1025 of the error log file

Checking the Error Log

The error log file records information on errors that occurred during the client’s request processing and is stored to $CUBRID/log/broker/error_log<broker_name>_<app_server_num>.err file. For error codes and error messages, see CAS Error.

The following example and description show an error log:

Time: 02/04/09 13:45:17.687 - SYNTAX ERROR *** ERROR CODE = -493, Tran = 1, EID = 38
Syntax: Unknown class "unknown_tbl". select * from unknown_tbl
  • Time: 02/04/09 13:45:17.687: Time when the error occurred
    • SYNTAX ERROR: Type of error (e.g. SYNTAX ERROR, ERROR, etc.)
  • *** ERROR CODE = -493: Error code
  • Tran = 1: Transaction ID. -1 indicates that no transaction ID is assigned.
  • EID = 38: Error ID. This ID is used to find the SQL log related to the server or client logs when an error occurs during SQL statement processing.
  • Syntax …: Error message (An ellipsis ( … ) indicates omission.)

Managing the SQL Log

The SQL log file records SQL statements requested by the application client and is stored with the name of <broker_name>_<app_server_num>. sql.log. The SQL log is generated in the log/broker/sql_log directory when the SQL_LOG parameter is set to ON. Note that the size of the SQL log file to be generated cannot exceed the value set for the SQL_LOG_MAX_SIZE parameter. CUBRID offers the broker_log_top and cubrid_replay utilities to manage SQL logs. Each utility should be executed in a directory where the corresponding SQL log exists.

The following examples and descriptions show SQL log files:

13-06-11 15:07:39.282 (0) STATE idle
13-06-11 15:07:44.832 (0) CLIENT IP 192.168.10.100
13-06-11 15:07:44.835 (0) CLIENT VERSION 10.2.0.8787
13-06-11 15:07:44.835 (0) session id for connection 0
13-06-11 15:07:44.836 (0) connect db demodb user dba url jdbc:cubrid:192.168.10.200:30000:demodb:dba:********: session id 12
13-06-11 15:07:44.836 (0) DEFAULT isolation_level 4, lock_timeout -1
13-06-11 15:07:44.840 (0) end_tran COMMIT
13-06-11 15:07:44.841 (0) end_tran 0 time 0.000
13-06-11 15:07:44.841 (0) *** elapsed time 0.004

13-06-11 15:07:44.844 (0) check_cas 0
13-06-11 15:07:44.848 (0) set_db_parameter lock_timeout 1000
13-06-11 15:09:36.299 (0) check_cas 0
13-06-11 15:09:36.303 (0) get_db_parameter isolation_level 4
13-06-11 15:09:36.375 (1) prepare 0 CREATE TABLE unique_tbl (a INT PRIMARY key);
13-06-11 15:09:36.376 (1) prepare srv_h_id 1
13-06-11 15:09:36.419 (1) set query timeout to 0 (no limit)
13-06-11 15:09:36.419 (1) execute srv_h_id 1 CREATE TABLE unique_tbl (a INT PRIMARY key);
13-06-11 15:09:38.247 (1) execute 0 tuple 0 time 1.827
13-06-11 15:09:38.247 (0) auto_commit
13-06-11 15:09:38.344 (0) auto_commit 0
13-06-11 15:09:38.344 (0) *** elapsed time 1.968

13-06-11 15:09:54.481 (0) get_db_parameter isolation_level 4
13-06-11 15:09:54.484 (0) close_req_handle srv_h_id 1
13-06-11 15:09:54.484 (2) prepare 0 INSERT INTO unique_tbl VALUES (1);
13-06-11 15:09:54.485 (2) prepare srv_h_id 1
13-06-11 15:09:54.488 (2) set query timeout to 0 (no limit)
13-06-11 15:09:54.488 (2) execute srv_h_id 1 INSERT INTO unique_tbl VALUES (1);
13-06-11 15:09:54.488 (2) execute 0 tuple 1 time 0.001
13-06-11 15:09:54.488 (0) auto_commit
13-06-11 15:09:54.505 (0) auto_commit 0
13-06-11 15:09:54.505 (0) *** elapsed time 0.021

...

13-06-11 15:19:04.593 (0) get_db_parameter isolation_level 4
13-06-11 15:19:04.597 (0) close_req_handle srv_h_id 2
13-06-11 15:19:04.597 (7) prepare 0 SELECT * FROM unique_tbl  WHERE ROWNUM BETWEEN 1 AND 5000;
13-06-11 15:19:04.598 (7) prepare srv_h_id 2 (PC)
13-06-11 15:19:04.602 (7) set query timeout to 0 (no limit)
13-06-11 15:19:04.602 (7) execute srv_h_id 2 SELECT * FROM unique_tbl  WHERE ROWNUM BETWEEN 1 AND 5000;
13-06-11 15:19:04.602 (7) execute 0 tuple 1 time 0.001
13-06-11 15:19:04.607 (0) end_tran COMMIT
13-06-11 15:19:04.607 (0) end_tran 0 time 0.000
13-06-11 15:19:04.607 (0) *** elapsed time 0.009
  • 13-06-11 15:07:39.282: Time when the application sent the request
  • (1): Sequence number of the SQL statement group. If prepared statement pooling is used, it is uniquely assigned to each SQL statement in the file.
  • CLIENT IP: An IP of an application client
  • CLIENT VERSION: A driver’s version of an application client
  • prepare 0: Whether or not it is a prepared statement
  • prepare srv_h_id 1: Prepares the SQL statement as srv_h_id 1.
  • (PC): It is displayed if the data in the plan cache is used.
  • Execute 0 tuple 1 time 0.001: One row is executed. The time spent is 0.001 seconds.
  • auto_commit/auto_rollback: Automatically committed or rolled back. The second auto_commit/auto_rollback is an error code. 0 indicates that the transaction has been completed without an error.

broker_log_top

The broker_log_top utility analyzes the SQL logs which are generated for a specific period. As a result, the information of SQL statements and time execution are displayed in files by order of the longest execution time; the results of SQL statements are stored in log.top.q and those of execution time are stored in log.top.res, respectively.

The broker_log_top utility is useful to analyze a long running query. The syntax is as follows:

broker_log_top [options] sql_log_file_list
  • sql_log_file_list: names of log files to analyze.

The following is [options] used on broker_log_top.

-t

The result is displayed in transaction unit.

-F DATETIME

Specifies the execution start date and time of the SQL statements to be analyzed. The input format is YY[-MM[-DD[ hh[:mm[:ss[.msec]]]]]], and the part enclosed by [] can be omitted. If you omit the value, it is regarded as that 01 is input for MM and DD, and 0 is input for hh, mm, ss and msec.

-T DATETIME

Specifies the execution end date and time of the SQL statements to be analyzed. The input format is the same with the DATE in the -F options.

All logs are displayed by SQL statement if any option is not specified.

The following sets the search range to milliseconds

broker_log_top -F "01/19 15:00:25.000" -T "01/19 15:15:25.180" log1.log

The part where the time format is omitted is set to 0 by default. This means that -F “01/19 00:00:00.000” -T “01/20 00:00:00.000” is input.

broker_log_top -F "01/19" -T "01/20" log1.log

The following logs are the results of executing the broker_log_top utility; logs are generated from Nov. 11th to Nov. 12th, and it is displayed in the order of the longest execution of SQL statements. Each month and day are separated by a slash (/) when specifying period. Note that “*.sql.log” is not recognized so the SQL logs should be separated by a white space on Windows.

--Execution broker_log_top on Linux
% broker_log_top -F "11/11" -T "11/12" -t *.sql.log

query_editor_1.sql.log
query_editor_2.sql.log
query_editor_3.sql.log
query_editor_4.sql.log
query_editor_5.sql.log

--Executing broker_log_top on Windows
% broker_log_top -F "11/11" -T "11/12" -t query_editor_1.sql.log query_editor_2.sql.log query_editor_3.sql.log query_editor_4.sql.log query_editor_5.sql.log

The log.top.q and log.top.res files are generated in the same directory where the analyzed logs are stored when executing the example above; In the log.top.q file, you can see each SQL statement, and its line number. In the log.top.res file, you can see the minimum execution time, the maximum execution time, the average execution time, and the number of execution queries for each SQL statement.

--log.top.q file
[Q1]-------------------------------------------
broker1_6.sql.log:137734
11/11 18:17:59.396 (27754) execute_all srv_h_id 34 select a.int_col, b.var_col from dml_v_view_6 a, dml_v_view_6 b, dml_v_view_6 c , dml_v_view_6 d, dml_v_view_6 e where a.int_col=b.int_col and b.int_col=c.int_col and c.int_col=d.int_col and d.int_col=e.int_col order by 1,2;
11/11 18:18:58.378 (27754) execute_all 0 tuple 497664 time 58.982
.
.
[Q4]-------------------------------------------
broker1_100.sql.log:142068
11/11 18:12:38.387 (27268) execute_all srv_h_id 798 drop table list_test;
11/11 18:13:08.856 (27268) execute_all 0 tuple 0 time 30.469

--log.top.res file

              max       min        avg   cnt(err)
-----------------------------------------------------
[Q1]        58.982    30.371    44.676    2 (0)
[Q2]        49.556    24.023    32.688    6 (0)
[Q3]        35.548    25.650    30.599    2 (0)
[Q4]        30.469     0.001     0.103 1050 (0)

cubrid_replay

cubrid_replay utility replays the SQL log in the broker and outputs the results sorted in order from the large difference(from the slower query than the existing one) by comparing the difference in the execution time of playback and the existing execution time.

This utility plays back the queries that are logged in the SQL log, but does not execute the queries to change the data. If any options are not given, only SELECT queries are run; if -r option is given, it changes the UPDATE and DELETE queries into SELECT queries and runs them.

This utility can be used to compare the performance between two different hosts; for example, there can be a performance difference for a same query between master and slave even if their h/w specs are the same.

cubrid_replay -I <broker_host> -P <broker_port> -d <db_name> [options] <sql_log_file> <output_file>
  • broker_host: IP address or host name of the CUBRID broker
  • broker_port: Port number of the CUBRID broker
  • db_name: The name of database to run the query
  • sql_log_file: SQL log file of the CUBRID broker($CUBRID/log/broker/sql_log/*.log, *.log.bak)
  • output_file: File name to save the execution result

The following is [options] used in cubrid_replay.

-u DB_USER

Specifies the DB account(default: public).

-p DB_PASSWORD

Specifies database password

-r

Changes UPDATE and DELETE queries into SELECT queries

-h SECOND

Specifies the term to wait between queries to run(default: 0.01 sec)

-D SECOND

The queries are output to output_file only when the specified term is bigger than (replayed execution time - previous execution time)(default: 0.01 sec).

-F DATETIME

Specifies the execution start date and time of the SQL statements to be replayed. The input format is YY[-MM[-DD[ hh[:mm[:ss[.msec]]]]]], and the part enclosed by [] can be omitted. If you omit the value, it is regarded as that 01 is input for MM and DD, and 0 is input for hh, mm, ss and msec.

-T DATETIME

Specifies the execution end date and time of the SQL statements to be replayed. The input format is the same with the DATE in the -F options.

$ cubrid_replay -I testhost -P 33000 -d testdb -u dba -r testdb_1_11_1.sql.log.bak output.txt

If you run the above command, the summary of execution result is displayed on the console.

------------------- Result Summary --------------------------
* Total queries : 153103
* Skipped queries (see skip.sql) : 5127
* Error queries (see replay.err) : 30
* Slow queries (time diff > 0.000 secs) : 89987
* Max execution time diff : 0.016
* Avg execution time diff : -0.001

cubrid_replay run time : 245.308417 sec
  • Total queries: Number of total queries within the specified date and time. They include DDL and DML
  • Skipped queries: Number of queries which cannot be changed from UPDATE/DELETE into SELECT when -r option is specified. These queries are saved into skip.sql
  • Slow queries: Number of queries of which execution time difference is bigger than the specified value by -D option(the replayed execution time is slower than the previous execution time plus the specified value). If you omit the -D option, this option value is specified as 0.01 second
  • Max execution time diff: The biggest value among the differences of the execution time(unit: sec)
  • Avg execution time diff: Average value of the differences of the execution time(unit: sec)
  • cubrid_replay run time: Execution time of this utility

“Skipped queries” are the cases which query-transform from UPDATE/DELETE to SELECT is impossible by the internal reason; the queries which are written to skip.sql are needed to check separately.

Also, you should consider that the execution time of the transformed queries does not include the data modification time.

In the output.txt file, SQLs that the replayed SQL execution time is slower than the SQL execution time in SQL log are written. That is, {(the replayed SQL execution time) - {(the execution time in SQL log) + (the specified time by -D option)} is sorted in descending order. Because -r option is used, UPDATE/DELETE is rewritten into SELECT and run.

EXEC TIME (REPLAY / SQL_LOG / DIFF): 0.003 / 0.001 / 0.002
SQL: UPDATE NDV_QUOTA_INFO SET last_mod_date = now() , used_quota = ( SELECT IFNULL(sum(file_size),0) FROM NDV_RECYCLED_FILE_INFO WHERE user_id = ? ) + ( SELECT IFNULL(sum(file_size),0) FROM NDV_FILE_INFO WHERE user_id = ? ) WHERE user_id = ? /* SQL : NDVMUpdResetUsedQuota */
REWRITE SQL: select NDV_QUOTA_INFO, class NDV_QUOTA_INFO, cast( SYS_DATETIME as datetime), cast((select ifnull(sum(NDV_RECYCLED_FILE_INFO.file_size), 0) from NDV_RECYCLED_FILE_INFO NDV_RECYCLED_FILE_INFO where (NDV_RECYCLED_FILE_INFO.user_id= ?:0 ))+(select ifnull(sum(NDV_FILE_INFO.file_size), 0) from NDV_FILE_INFO NDV_FILE_INFO where (NDV_FILE_INFO.user_id= ?:1 )) as bigint) from NDV_QUOTA_INFO NDV_QUOTA_INFO where (NDV_QUOTA_INFO.user_id= ?:2 )
BIND 1: 'babaemo'
BIND 2: 'babaemo'
BIND 3: 'babaemo'
  • EXEC TIME: (replay time / execution time in the SQL log / difference between the two execution times)
  • SQL: The original SQL which exists in the SQL log of the broker
  • REWRITE SQL: Transformed SELECT queries from UPDATE/DELETE queries by -r option.

Note

broker_log_runner is deprecated from 9.3. Therefore, instead of broker_log_runner, use cubrid_replay.

CAS Error

CAS error is an error which occurs in broker application server(CAS), and it can happen on all applications which access to CAS with drivers.

Below shows the CAS error code table. CCI and JDBC’s error messages can be different each other on the same CAS error code. If there is only one message, they are the same, but if there are two messages, then the first one is CCI error message and the second one is JDBC error message.

Error Code Name(Error Number) Error Message (CCI / JDBC) Note
CAS_ER_INTERNAL(-10001)    
CAS_ER_NO_MORE_MEMORY(-10002) Memory allocation error  
CAS_ER_COMMUNICATION(-10003) Cannot receive data from client / Communication error  
CAS_ER_ARGS(-10004) Invalid argument  
CAS_ER_TRAN_TYPE(-10005) Invalid transaction type argument / Unknown transaction type  
CAS_ER_SRV_HANDLE(-10006) Server handle not found / Internal server error  
CAS_ER_NUM_BIND(-10007) Invalid parameter binding value argument / Parameter binding error The number of data to be bound does not match with the number of data to be transferred.
CAS_ER_UNKNOWN_U_TYPE(-10008) Invalid T_CCI_U_TYPE value / Parameter binding error  
CAS_ER_DB_VALUE(-10009) Cannot make DB_VALUE  
CAS_ER_TYPE_CONVERSION(-10010) Type conversion error  
CAS_ER_PARAM_NAME(-10011) Invalid T_CCI_DB_PARAM value / Invalid database parameter name The name of the system parameter is not valid.
CAS_ER_NO_MORE_DATA(-10012) Invalid cursor position / No more data  
CAS_ER_OBJECT(-10013) Invalid oid / Object is not valid  
CAS_ER_OPEN_FILE(-10014) Cannot open file / File open error  
CAS_ER_SCHEMA_TYPE(-10015) Invalid T_CCI_SCH_TYPE value / Invalid schema type  
CAS_ER_VERSION(-10016) Version mismatch The DB server version does not compatible with the client (CAS) version.
CAS_ER_FREE_SERVER(-10017) Cannot process the request. Try again later The CAS which handles connection request of applications cannot be assigned.
CAS_ER_NOT_AUTHORIZED_CLIENT(-10018) Authorization error Access is denied.
CAS_ER_QUERY_CANCEL(-10019) Cannot cancel the query  
CAS_ER_NOT_COLLECTION(-10020) The attribute domain must be the set type  
CAS_ER_COLLECTION_DOMAIN(-10021) Heterogeneous set is not supported / The domain of a set must be the same data type  
CAS_ER_NO_MORE_RESULT_SET(-10022) No More Result  
CAS_ER_INVALID_CALL_STMT(-10023) Illegal CALL statement  
CAS_ER_STMT_POOLING(-10024) Invalid plan  
CAS_ER_DBSERVER_DISCONNECTED(-10025) Cannot communicate with DB Server  
CAS_ER_MAX_PREPARED_STMT_COUNT_EXCEEDED(-10026) Cannot prepare more than MAX_PREPARED_STMT_COUNT statements  
CAS_ER_HOLDABLE_NOT_ALLOWED(-10027) Holdable results may not be updatable or sensitive  
CAS_ER_HOLDABLE_NOT_ALLOWED_KEEP_CON_OFF(-10028) Holdable results are not allowed while KEEP_CONNECTION is off  
CAS_ER_NOT_IMPLEMENTED(-10100) None / Attempt to use a not supported service  
CAS_ER_IS(-10200) None / Authentication failure  

CUBRID Manager Server

Starting the CUBRID Manager Server

The following example shows how to start the CUBRID Manager server.

% cubrid manager start

The following message is returned if the CUBRID Manager server is already running.

% cubrid manager start
@ cubrid manager server start
++ cubrid manager server is running.

Stopping the CUBRID Manager Server

The following example shows how to stop the CUBRID Manager server.

% cubrid manager stop
@ cubrid manager server stop
++ cubrid manager server stop: success

CUBRID Manager Server Log

The logs of CUBRID Manager server are stored in the log/manager directory under the installation directory. There are four types of log files depending on server process of CUBRID Manager.

  • auto_backupdb.log: Backup log about the backup-automated jobs which was reserved by the CUBRID Manager Client
  • auto_execquery.log: Execution log about the query-automated jobs which was reserved by the CUBRID Manager Client
  • cub_js.access.log: Access log regarding the successful logins and tasks in CUBRID Manager Server.
  • cub_js.error.log: Access log regarding the failed logins and tasks in CUBRID Manager Server.

Configuring CUBRID Manager Server

The configuration file name for the CUBRID Manager server is cm.conf and located in the $CUBRID/conf directory. In the CUBRID Manager server configuration file, where parameter names and values are stored, comments are prefaced by “#.” Parameter names and values are separated by spaces or an equal sign (=).

This page describes parameters that are specified in the cm.conf file.

cm_port

cm_port is a parameter used to configure a communication port for the connection between the CUBRID Manager server and the client. The default value is 8001 .

monitor_interval

monitor_interval is a parameter used to configure the monitoring interval of cub_auto in seconds. The default value is 5 .

allow_user_multi_connection

allow_user_multi_connection is a parameter used to have multiple client connections allowed to the CUBRID Manager server. The default value is YES . Therefore, more than one CUBRID Manager client can connect to the CUBRID Manager server, even with the same user name.

server_long_query_time

server_long_query_time is a parameter used to configure delay reference time in seconds when configuring slow_query which is one of server diagnostics items. The default value is 10 . If the execution time of the query performed on the server exceeds this parameter value, the number of the slow_query parameters will increase.

auto_job_timeout

auto_job_timeout is a parameter used to configure timeout of auto job for cub_auto. The default value is 43200 (12 hour).

mon_cub_auto

mon_cub_auto is a parameter used to allow cub_js to restart cub_auto process when cub_auto is not running or not. The default value is NO.

token_active_time

token_active_time is a parameter used to configure timeout of token. The default value is 7200 (2 hour).

support_mon_statistic

support_mon_statistic is a parameter used to configure monitoring statistic of system or not. The default value is NO.

cm_process_monitor_interval

cm_process_monitor_interval is an interval time for collecting statistics. The default and the minimum value is 5 (5 minutes).

CUBRID Manager User Management Console

The account and password of CUBRID Manager user are used to access the CUBRID Manager server when starting the CUBRID Manager client, distinguishing this user from the database user. CUBRID Manager Administrator (cm_admin) is a CLI tool that manages user information and it executes commands in the console window to manage users. This utility only supports Linux OS.

The following shows how to use the CUBRID Manager (hereafter, CM) Administrator utilities. The utilities can be used through GUI on the CUBRID Manager client.

cm_admin <utility_name>
<utility_name>:
    adduser [<option>] <cmuser-name> <cmuser-password>   --- Adds a CM user
    deluser <cmuser-name>   --- Deletes a CM user
    viewuser [<cmuser-name>]   --- Displays CM user information
    changeuserauth [<option>] <cmuser-name>  --- Changes the CM user authority
    changeuserpwd [<option>] <cmuser-name>  --- Changes the CM user password
    adddbinfo [<option>] <cmuser-name> <database-name>  --- Adds database information of the CM user
    deldbinfo <cmuser-name> <database-name>  --- Deletes database information of the CM user
    changedbinfo [<option>] <database-name> number-of-pages --- Changes database information of the CM user

CM Users

Information about CM users consists of the following:

  • CM user authority: Includes the following information.
    • The permission to configure broker
    • The permission to create a database. For now, this authority is only given to the admin user.
    • The permission to monitor status
  • Database information: A database that a CM user can use
  • CM user password

The default user authority of CUBRID Manager is admin and its password is admin. Users who has admin authority have full administrative controls.

Adding CM Users

The cm_admin adduser utility creates a CM user who has been granted a specific authority and has database information. The permissions to configure broker, create a database, and monitor status can be granted to the CM user.

cm_admin adduser [options] cmuser-name cmuser-password
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • adduser: A command to create a new CM user
  • cmuser-name: Specifies a unique name to a CM user. Usable characters are 0~9, A~Z, a~z and _. Minimum length is 4 and maximum length is 32. If the specified name in cmuser-name is identical to the existing one, cm_admin will stop creating a new CM user.
  • cmuser-password: A password of a CM user. Usable characters are 0~9, A~Z, a~z and _. Minimum length is 4 and maximum length is 32.

The following is [options] of cm_admin adduser.

-b, --broker AUTHORITY

Specifies the broker authority which will be granted to a new CM user.

You can use admin, none (default), and monitor as AUTHORITY

The following example shows how to create a CM user whose name is testcm and password is testcmpwd and then configure broker authority to monitor.

cm_admin adduser -b monitor testcm testcmpwd
-c, --dbcreate AUTHORITY

Specifies the authority to create a database which will be granted to a new CM user.

You can use none (default) and admin as AUTHORITY.

The following example shows how to create a CM user whose name is testcm and password is testcmpwd and then configure database creation authority to admin.

cm_admin adduser -c admin testcm testcmpwd
-m, --monitor AUTHORITY

Specifies the authority to monitor status which will be granted to a new CM user. You can use admin, none (default), and monitor as AUTHORITY

The following example shows how to create a CM user whose name is testcm and password is testcmpwd and then configure monitoring authority to admin.

cm_admin adduser -m admin testcm testcmpwd
-d, --dbinfo INFO_STRING

Specifies database information of a new CM user. The format of INFO_STRING must be “<dbname>;<uid>;<broker_ip>,<broker_port>”. The following example shows how to add database information “testdb;dba;localhost,30000” to a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin adduser -d "testdb;dba;localhost,30000" testcm testcmpwd

Deleting CM Users

The cm_admin deluser utility deletes a CM user.

cm_admin deluser cmuser-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • deluser: A command to delete an existing CM user
  • cmuser-name: The name of a CM user to be deleted

The following example shows how to delete a CM user named testcm.

cm_admin deluser testcm

Displaying CM User information

The cm_admin viewuser utility displays information of a CM user.

cm_admin viewuser cmuser-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • viewuser: A command to display the CM user information
  • cmuser-name: A CM user name. If this value is entered, information only for the specified user is displayed; if it is omitted, information for all CM users is displayed.

The following example shows how to display information of a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin viewuser testcm

The information will be displayed as follows:

CM USER: testcm
  Auth info:
    broker: none
    dbcreate: none
    statusmonitorauth: none
  DB info:
    ==========================================================================================
     DBNAME                                           UID               BROKER INFO
    ==========================================================================================
     testdb                                           dba               localhost,30000

Changing the Authority of CM Users

The cm_admin changeuserauth utility changes the authority of a CM user.

cm_admin changeuserauth options cmuser-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • changeuserauth: A command to change the authority of a CM user
  • cmuser-name: The name of a CM user whose authority to be changed

The following is [options] of cm_admin changeuserauth.

-b, --broker AUTHORITY

Specifies the broker authority that will be granted to a CM user. You can use admin, none, and monitor as AUTHORITY.

The following example shows how to change the broker authority of a CM user named testcm to monitor.

cm_admin changeuserauth -b monitor testcm
-c, --dbcreate

Specifies the authority to create a database which will be granted to a CM user. You can use admin and none as AUTHORITY .

The following example shows how to change the database creation authority of a CM user named testcm to admin.

cm_admin changeuserauth -c admin testcm
-m, --monitor

Specifies the authority to monitor status which will be granted to a CM user. You can use admin, none, and monitor as AUTHORITY.

The following example shows how to change the monitoring authority of a CM user named testcm to admin.

cm_admin changeuserauth -m admin testcm

Changing the CM User Password

The cm_admin changeuserpwd utility changes the password of a CM user.

cm_admin changeuserpwd [options] cmuser-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • changeuserpwd: A command to change the password of a CM user
  • cmuser-name: The name of a CM user whose password to be changed

The following is [options] of cm_admin changeuserpwd.

-o, --oldpass PASSWORD

Specifies the existing password of a CM user.

The following example shows how to change a password of a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin changeuserpwd -o old_password -n new_password testcm
--adminpass PASSWORD

The password of an admin user can be specified instead of old CM user’s password that you don’t know.

The following example shows how to change a password of a CM user named testcm by using an admin password.

cm_admin changeuserauth --adminpass admin_password -n new_password testcm
-n, --newpass PASSWORD

Specifies a new password of a CM user.

Adding Database Information to CM Users

The cm_admin adddbinfo utility adds database information (database name, UID, broker IP, and broker port) to a CM user.

cm_admin adddbinfo options cmuser-name database-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • adddbinfo: A command to add database information to a CM user
  • cmuser-name: CM user name
  • database-name: The name of a database to be added

The following example shows how to add a database without specifying any user-defined values to a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin adddbinfo testcm testdb

The following is [options] of cm_admin adddbinfo.

-u, --uid ID

Specifies the ID of a database user to be added. The default value is dba.

The following example shows how to add a database whose name is testdb and user ID is cubriduser to a CM user named testcm.

cm_admin adddbinfo -u cubriduser testcm testdb
-h, --host IP

Specifies the host IP of a broker used when clients access a database. The default value is localhost.

The following example shows how to add a database whose name is testdb and the host IP of is 127.0.0.1 to a CM user named testcm.

cm_admin adddbinfo -h 127.0.0.1 testcm testdb
-p, --port NUMBER

Specifies the port number of a broker used when clients access a database. The default value: 30000.

Deleting database information from CM Users

The cm_admin deldbinfo utility deletes database information of a specified CM user.

cm_admin deldbinfo cmuser-name database-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • deldbinfo: A command to delete database information of a CM user
  • cmuser-name: CM user name
  • database-name: The name of a database to be deleted

The following example shows how to delete database information whose name is testdb from a CM user named testcm.

cm_admin deldbinfo testcm testdb

Changing Database Information of a CM user

The cm_admin changedbinfo utility changes database information of a specified CM user.

cm_admin changedbinfo [options] cmuser-name database-name
  • cm_admin: An integrated utility to manage CUBRID Manager
  • changedbinfo: A command to change database information of a CM user
  • cmuser-name: CM user name
  • database-name: The name of a database to be changed

The following is [options] of cm_admin changedbinfo.

-u, --uid ID

Specifies the ID of a database user.

The following example shows how to update user ID information to uid in the testdb database which belongs to a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin changedbinfo -u uid testcm testdb
-h, --host IP

Specifies the host of a broker used when clients access a database.

The following example shows how to update host IP information to 10.34.63.132 in the testdb database which belongs to a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin changedbinfo -h 10.34.63.132 testcm testdb
-p, --port NUMBER

Specifies the port number of a broker used when clients access a database.

The following example shows how to update broker port information to 33000 in the testdb database which belongs to a CM user named testcm .

cm_admin changedbinfo -p 33000 testcm testdb